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Levi’s Type III Big E Trucker Jacket w/ Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Patches

9 Oct

The Levi’s Type III Big E Jacket similar style to what is known today as the Trucker Jacket, but with small differences like no side pockets and bright orange thread. The Type III is successor to the Type II and Type I. The jacket is Big E era which makes it pre -1971, Though the style continued on for the remainder of the 70s with the small e tag.

This particular jacket is has a total of seven patches commemorating the great Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta from the 1980s. Back Patches are from 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86 with another undated patch on the right shoulder. The AIBF was started in 1972 and is the world’s largest balloon festival.

Lee Riders Sanforized, Union Made Selvedge Denim

10 Oct

Lee Riders, also known as the 101Z debuted in the 1950s and represent  a transition from the company’s work wear history in to more casual, mass appeal wears.

On this particular pair the inside Tag is marked: Lee Riders Sanforized Waist 32 Union Made in the USA.  The Button back is stamped: R.  Zipper is made by Talon. Lee riveted front and coin pockets. “lazy S” stitched on rear pockets.  The “branded” Lee patch is long gone. You’ll notice on Lees, unlike Levi’s the selvedge denim self edged appears on only one side of the outer seam.

As with most items from  time and place predating the “throw-away age”, these jeans are well-worn and have been mended multiple times. There’s a bout a 4.5″ x 6″ patch on the  right thigh.  A 2″ x 3″ patch on the left side below the rear pocket. A hole and repair with red thread on the left knee, a small hole forming below the zipper on the right side front, and a 4″ hole in the left cheek with additional wear below.  Some white paint and other darker stains. Round out the patina that only time can create.

Mountain Equipment Co-op Parka

20 Feb

In short, Mountain Equipment Co-op was founded in Vancouver, BC circa 1971 by a group of individuals sick of crossing the border to shop at REI in Seattle. This malcontent for border crossings and a passion for quality outdoor goods has led to the MEC to become one of the largest co-ops of outdoorsmen in the world. The Co-op is still in operation today making gear for its user/owners with the same enthusiasm as they had 40 years ago.

The parka seen here from the early to mid 1970s is very similar to what one would have found at REI during the same time period. It is made of a 65/35 cotton/poly blend, in an ever popular color combination for the time. What excites me the most about this parka is the thought that went in to the lining. Both the lower half of the torso and sleeves are lined in a light nylon. This allows for much freer movement as friction between the parka and any under layer is greatly reduced. The alternating of Navy and Khaki is quite nice as well.

The parka appears to have been produced under contract by Winner Sportswear LTD of Vancouver. Using local and foreign manufactures to produce items is common amongst Co-ops. Here you can see a later parka contracted by REI from Korean manufacturer Natural Comfort.

1st Lead Telluride, Colorado – Parka

12 Feb

This is a great parka from a rare Colorado company. First Lead exists today as an outdoor preparedness and training organization based out of Norwood Colorado, about 30 miles from Telluride. In talking with a spokesperson for First Lead I leaned the training outfit shares no direct relation to the outdoor gear company, but is cut from the same stock of friends and outdoor enthusiasts that started 1st Lead back in the 70s.   

This  piece is  typical in many ways of other parka from this era by other Colorado companies like Holubar and Frostline.  A shell constructed from a cotton blend (most likely 65/35 cotton/poly). Added weight and warmth from an inner layer of the same material. Standard parka trimmings like the yoked shoulder panel and multiple large pockets for storage. Beyond that, this parka has some major difference from its competitors. Maybe the most noticeable is the lack of a hood. It’s not that it got lost, there’s not even snaps or a zipper half to attach one too. The cut of this parka is lot shorter too, ending just below the waist as opposed to mid-thigh length. Another difference is the leather backed snaps. Not exactly sure of the purposes here, I am sure it added durability to the snaps, but it also adds weight. Peaks on the front of part of the shoulder yoke point a little more than others, and there is an absence of chest pockets. Maintains traditional accouterments like the back pocket (closed by a small talon zipper), waist cinch, and Velcro cuffs. 
Can’t wait to find more gear from 1st Lead to see what other kind of things they were doing different so many years ago!

Banana Equipment Anorak Parka

1 Feb

Banana Equipment is among my favorite of all the early Colorado labels. Banana’s slogan was “products with a peel” and they were one of the first companies to put Gore-Tex fabric to proper use. This simple pullover is a single light weight water/wind barrier when your out in the elements. 1/4 zip YKK zipper closure with banana embossed snaps.  Great two-piece design hood with peak and underlying draw cord for a nice,functional closure. Velcro close kangaroo pouch pocket with overlaying storm flap. Velcro cinch cuffs, and bottom draw cord round out this pieces simple structure. Back of Gore-Tex label marked IV-79, it would make perfect sense for jacket to be from 1979. Seam sealant is still visible on the unlined fabric, common on early Gore-Tex goods

Banana Equipment was founded in Estes Park, Colorado in 1972 and  the brand was later sold in 1980. Labels changed slightly over the years. At one time they bear the location Boulder, Colorado and later versions don’t contain a city at all. Recently the label has been resurrected and a new line of day packs are available. Find the new Banana Equipment at www.bananaequipment.com.

 

Alpine Designs (Alp Sport) Down Jacket

10 Jan

Alp Sport was started in Boulder Colorado in the early 60’s and later became known as Alpine Designs. This unique jacket comes from that transitional period sometime in the mid to late  1960s.

The shell is constructed from a tightly woven nylon which is light and dense, much like modern shells. The down fill is fairly lofty, but this definitely not an expedition piece.  The subtle outside gives way to an all cotton, vibrant paisley lining.  Talon zippers, with Alpine Designs’ edelweiss flower logo embossed on the snaps. The gommeted tab suggest it could be used as a ski jacket.

This jacket can be seen as an early example of outerwear as a fashionable piece. In the late 60s, early 70s decades of advancements in outdoor gear design started popping up on college campus’ nation wide as students embraced this new style. A sea change that helped propel companies like The North Face and Patagonia into the upper stratosphere, while giving rise to a whole new crop of labels and the eventual demise of most.

100% VIirgin Wool Filson Mackinaw Cruiser

27 Nov

This here is a classic, light weight, 100% virgin wool Filson Cruiser. Beautiful dark olive-green, this virgin wool is tightly woven and soft enough to wear on skin.

This classic cruiser design features:

  • 6 Filson embossed snap closure
  • 4 front pockets with snap flap closure
  • Divided pen pocket on front left breast pocket
  • Smaller watch type pocket on front left hip pocket
  • Rear pass through game pocket.

The name “Cruiser” stems from a term for timber surveyor’s in the Pacific Northwest for whom Filson’s original design was patterned for.

Woolrich Striped Hudson Bay Blanket Jacket

20 Nov

Vintage Woolrich Hudson Bay blanket inspired  jacket. These Heavy weight wool jackets feature a  heavy-duty two-way YKK  “sleeping bag” zipper. The zipper is hidden behind a Woolrich logo stamped snap button placket. Blanket stitched edges outline the openings and add durability to the piece. Hudson Bay woolens come in various color combinations, but he green, red and yellow may just be the very best.

Vanson Leathers Motorcycle Jacket. Boston, Mass U.S.A.

24 Oct

This Vanson Leathers women’s size 10 motorcycle jacket is expertly crafted using top quality full grain leather. Styling is a good mix of traditional biker and cafe style jacket. racer-esque lines down the front and contour at the midriff. Fully lined with removable vest for extra warmth.

Features:
  • Brass tone Talon zippers through out.
  • Four front pockets
  • snap down collar
  • side compression buckles
  • gusseted shoulders for expansion across the back
  • zippered sleeves
  • removable synthetic vest
This jacket is in good shape. No holes, stains, broken stitching or odors. Only visible signs of wear on shoulders, and back of arms characterized by lightnessin the leather’s color from friction. See photos. Liner in great shape. Doesn’t appear this jacket has ever been down on a motorcycle. Estimated this jacket is from the mid 60s to 70s. 
 
This jacket is currently available, please contact me for more information. 

Barbour Vintage A130 Spey Wading Wax Jacket

22 Oct

Classic Barbour Spey waxed cotton wading jacket. These jackets have a short wide torso efficiently designed for wading while fly fishing. Made in England of high quality materials and superb craftsmanship since 1894.

Other features of the jacket are:

  • Corduroy collar
  • Storm fly front with Brass finish KANE snaps
  • Heavy gauge YKK two-way zip
  • Two hip pockets with storm flaps
  • Barbour tartan lining
  • Inner  breast pocket  and two lower large stow pockets
  • Outer D rings on right breast and left side
  • Adjustable inner nylon wrist gaiters
  • Grommet ventilated pits

Measurements on this size medium jacket were as follows
18.5″ top of zip to bottom hem
23″ pit to pit
29.5 collar seam to cuff
21″ pit to cuff

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