Vintage 1960s Motorcycle Patrol Jacket ~size 42~ Cal Leathers Style

Vintage 1960s Motorcycle Patrol Jacket ~size 42~ Cal Leathers Style.

This thick black heavy leather patrolman’s jacket is perfect for those who ride. Unfortunately this jacket has no labels or tags to help define its history, but I can assure you it’s the real deal. Badge holder, Serval zippers, heavy weight leather. It would be really easy for me to say this jacket is horsehide, which I very well might be, but with out a tag to prove it, I’ll stop short of that claim. I don’t have the expertise to say for certain. I have some jackets in my collection marked horsehide and others that are not and depending on the tanning process they can be very similar.

This jacket has a nice black satin liner in near perfect shape. Two had pockets and one inside pocket both lined with heavy cotton. Side lacing for a custom waist fit. Interestingly it is void of belt loops around the waist. Has snaps for a fur collar mount and black shearling lining the zippered wrists to keep the cold out.

Really nice shape for its age. a couple off-black spots near the badge holder. Visible if you’re looking for them. Also a little wear around the insides of the cuffs.

No size tag, but measures out to about a 42. See measurements below.

24″ pit to pit (sides flare out in the pits)
21″ across below the pit
20″ shoulder to shoulder
18.5″ pit to cuff
25″ shoulder to cuff
20″ top of zip to hem
25″ collar to hem in back

available on etsy https://www.etsy.com/people/basecampvintage

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Vintage Red Wing Black Label Flannel Lined 9″ Hunting Boots model 04130

Vintage Red Wing 04130 Black Label Flannel lined 9" hunting boots

This is a pair of Red Wing  9″ hunting boots marked 04130.  The boot is similar to the 877 but has a different vamp construction and most likely predates that model. The boots date from the late 50s or 60s as denoted by the black  label in the right boot.

Lace-up is achieved via 12 eyelets and the boots are currently outfitted with leather laces which don’t look quite old enough to be original. The Du-Flex Cush-N-Crepe soles look period correct. Inside, the boots are fully lined with red and black buffalo check flannel. Yes, even the foot-bed is lined. The flannel feels like wool or a wool blend.

The top of the right boot is stamped RED WING. Tongues are stamped on the outside:

S (crest looks like a union label) 60
11 1/2 B 04130
202

 

Herter’s Hudson Bay Hunting Work Boots

You are looking at the very finest pair of boots known to man. These Herter’s Genuine Hudson Bay Boots are fit for queens and kings alike, but made so that the lowly peasant can afford them.

This may have very well been how George Herter described these boots in one of his many volume of mail-order catalogs. Herter, an avoid outdoorsman, entrepreneur, writer and all-around kook, wrote garish product listings with the same panache that he put into his numerous hunting, fishing, cooking and motivational novels. Beyond enjoying a semi-successful writing and publishing career, George Herter also operated one of the most successful mail-order outdoors catalogs since Leon Leonwood Bean. The Waseca, Minnesota based operation ran from 1937 until the early 80s.

This pair of Herter’s Hudson Bay Boots is much like a plain toe hunting boot from Red Wing. The uppers are essentially made up of three pieces, the vamp extends from the toe around the lower areas of the foot to the heel of the boot. The upper connected along the side of the foot, then a back stay conceals the seam up the back. The tongue is solid across the front of the boot keeping the elements out and the boot is laced through a combination of D-rings and hooks. The boots appear to be fully leather lined giving them a little more insulation than a regular single walled boot.

Inside Markings:
7D 12150
S68 1200

Frye Black Label 2550 Campus Boot in Black

This is one beautiful pair of Frye Campus Boots in black.  This particular style of boot is indicative of the traditional campus cut popularized in the 60s and 70s.  The original Frye Black Label (black being the main color of the logo stitched in the right boot) verifies their authenticity. Around 1979 the black label was discontinued and a white label was introduced. At this time Frye also started embossing the logo on the outside heel of the boot.

The “Campus” style is a take on a traditional western style boot but with a blunt, rounded toe, thick sole and block heel. These boots are usually seen with lighter, banana or medium brown uppers with natural leather soles and heels. This particular boot is midnight black top to bottom, but maintains the natural undyed leather inside. In my researching these boots I found that the 2550 was show as ‘hand stained brown’ in an old Frye ad. I have no knowledge of whether that leather color may have varied in the model number 2550, but given that all other colors of the boot are assigned their own number, It is quite likely that these boots started their life as brown boots and were later dyed, or by some other means made black.

13.5″ shaft
2.25″ heel

Inside Markings:
11 D 4K13068
Made in the USA

These boots are currently available on the BCV eBay store

Singer Featherweight Travel Sewing Machine Model 221J

This is a Singer featherweight model # 221J made in St Johns, Canada 1961. Serial # JE154076.  Numbers starting with JE were among the last to come from the St. Johns factory which operated from 1904 – the early 1960s. There’s a myriad of history and information on the web around these machines as they’re highly prized and collected. As far as I could tell the 221J is a version of the 221K, the third iteration of the machine.  221 were and still are prized for having the capabilities of a full size machine, including attachments, in a relatively light and compact piece. Traveling seamstresses, club quilters and collectors still covet these machines today. I am not a sewing machine expert, but  know enough from growing up with a mom who sewed everything to thread and run this machine. It threads much the same as larger, later model Singers.

Cari-Kit Two Man Backpacking tent – early 1970s

 This two-man  tent is constructed using two poles at front one at rear. The front poles fit together with loops at the top and support the tent body which is ran up over the crossed loops and pulled taut with a staked cord. The single rear pole is shorter and is secured by top and bottom grommets and staked down with a cord. The tent comes to a high point at the front and is only about half as tall at the foot. The tent has a rain fly, but does not offer  a fully enclosed vestibule. It would most likely be considered a two or three season tent.

I received this tent from the original owner who said it was purchased from the original Holubar store in Boulder, Colo. in the early 70s. The tent bears a similarity to Holubar tents of the era and has good reason. Cari-Kit was the label originally used on Holubar’s line of sew-it-yourself products in 1972.  The name was later abandoned and the kits rebranded as Holubar Sew-It-Yourself Kits.

Other popular kit producers of the day include: Frostline, Altra, Eastern Mountain Sports, Country Ways, Mountain Adventure, Sundown and Plain Brown Wrapper. EMS enjoys continued success though the production of kits has since ceased. A newly resurected Holubar label produces fashionable and functional pieces in homage to the company name

Measures approx:

90″ long
60″ across
51″ high at front

Weighs approx:
6.5 lbs

This tent is available for sale.