Gerry Vagabond Back Pack

Gerry Vagabond Backpack

Late 1960s early 70s model Gerry Vagabond Pack. This is the pack that help solidified Gerry’s role in the outdoor sports manufacturing industry. The design was applied to frame packs and became an icon and a signature style. Whether you’re a fan or not of the horizontal pockets comes down to personal preference I suppose. While allowing for maximum compartmentalized storage and organization the pockets were somewhat limiting of the objects that could fit within.

This pack is an earlier model as denoted by the Gerry Boulder, Colorado logo, Coats & Clark zippers and the very interesting straps. These are unlike any other’s I’ve seen. Nylon straps with a foam pad. The pads are coated like that of a floatation device and adjustable on the strap to provide a good comfort level.  The “wish bone” style pack support is removable and is secured by three snap anchor points.

This model pack was one of several featured in issue five of Backpacker Magazine (1974) and received good marks.

 

Alpenlite Internal Frame backpack – Ventura, California

Alpenlite Internal Frame backpack - Ventura, California

You are looking at a nice Alpenlite internal frame pack. Alpinlite, I believe originated in Claremont, California and plenty examples of earlier goods can be found bearing that city name under their mountainous logo. Based on this design and the city of Ventura, I would guess it’s a later label circa late 70s or 80s. Similar to some JanSport packs this Alpenlite maintains a day pack type look and feel, in a larger reinforced package.

This pack has an interesting ‘X’ braced frame structure and suspended strap rigging. Pack construction consists of one large main compartment, two side canister type pockets, one front pocket on the flap of the main compartment, and a small top pocket above the shoulder straps. I added the red lashings I had lying around and they will come with it. My guess is the original would have been yellow like that of the loop. It’s a little hard to tell in the photos but the bottom is khaki, loop is yellow which make for a nice color combo. Leather lashings top and bottom with the metal D rings on the front. padded waist strap as well.

 

 

The North Face Bullfrog Two Man Backpacking Tent

Vintage The North Face Brown Label Bullfrog Two Man Backpacking Tent

1980s The North Face Bullfrog tent.  This is a later “brown label” model, a label that was used into the early mid eighties. I would classify the tent as a two-man, three season tent. Tent is a three pole free-standing tent. Sometimes referred to as a “bent pole” model as the shock cord poles are not perfectly straight when linked together. Two poles crisscross from the corners with another looping from side to side around the front for an easy yet sturdy structure. The rain fly includes a decent size vestibule. Zippered opening into the vestibule and through the fly screen and nylon door. Inside venting flaps are closed by Velcro in a weight saving exercise.

Tent measures:
94″ head to toe
45″ high at entrance
54″ wide at entrance

Weighs approximately:
6 lbs.

Gerry leather Bottom Day Pack

Gerry leather Bottom Day Pack

Early to mid 70s Gerry leather bottom backpack. Two compartments, stacked in the so-called “tear drop” fashion. Sturdy strap construction with thick padded shoulder straps and large D ring /leather top attachment. This model could be considered transitional from the earlier era of felt padded and leather straps. Front lashing with original nylon strap for holding poles or axes. Waist strap features the innovative Gerry two-pronged buckle.

Gerry External Frame Backpack – Early, Leather Bottom Model- Boulder, CO

Vintage Gerry External Frame Backpack - Early Leather Bottom - Boulder, Co - Med

Early Gerry external frame pack. This pack bears the Gerry Boulder, Colorado label and denotes production prior to the company being purchased by Outdoor Sports Corporation. This pack exhibits many of the common traits that came to dominate external frame pack construction in the 1970s up through the 1980s, but has its differences. The white leather bottom for instance is a great touch and common for construction of day packs which are often sat on the ground, but the added weight of the leather and lack of need for a toughened bottom would mean it was a feature not built to last. Secondly the one main compartment could make getting to what you needed on the trail difficult if packed incorrectly. This one large compartment construction would soon give way to more compartmentalized construction. (Gerry’s later Vagabond pack would take compartmentalized to whole new levels). The primitive waist strap is also an area later designs would improve upon. Though this bag does feature the patented buckle design it bolts directly to the frame and does not form a full padded belt. This is before the notion of “shoulder the load with your hips”

Beyond its shortcomings the pack is still beautifully designed and constructed. There are four canister style side pockets with leather pull tabs (missing on one). The bag is constructed of 100% nylon which was probably still somewhat exotic in its time. Padded shoulder straps. There’s also a pretty ingenious handle built into the frame.

The label is marked ‘Second’ meaning they found there was something wrong enough with it to not be sold as new, or possibly it was a prototype model later sold as a second. A small tag above the label has it sized a medium. Definitely a cool bag for any collection or use for its intended purpose.

Vintage Waist Packs

Vintage Famous Trails Pack

Hine Snowbridge – One of the great old labels from Colorado. This is a large pack measures about 17″ around the waist 6″ high top to bottom. 5″ deep. YKK zips, large metal clasp waist.

Exit Expeditions International – Not familiar with this label and have not seen it anywhere else. This late 70s or 80s pack features Ideal zips, large Fastex clamp waist. Clean and in good shape

Maran – Popular maker of packs of all sizes in the early to mid 1970s. Smaller pack than the hine or exit. 12″ across waist 5″ high 3 1/2″ deep. Unique design with the YKK zipper across the top. Seatbelt nylon waist strap with interlocking metal buckle. Clean, nice shape

Mark Pack Works – Albany CA.Little known about this maker and a seldom seen label. Medium size pack 13″ across waist, 6″ high 4.5″ deep. Has one main compartment with two internal compartments and removable foam which helps the pack keep its shape. Two side pockets, one on each strap arm. Skinny seatbelt nylon strap with small Fastex clip. C&C zippers

Famous Trails – A prolific maker out of San Diego California and contemporary to Kelty. This medium waist pack measures about 11.5″ across the waist, 6.5″ high top to bottom. 5″ deep. Awesome color combo of brown and cream. Features one main compartment with two smaller side pockets. Ideal zippers, large Fastex clasp waist. Full color Famous Trails label pops.

 

 

Holubar Wool Blend Knickers

This is the first pair of knickers from Holubar I’ve coma across, though I have seen similar styles from Woolrich. These grey tweed knickers are constructed from an 85% wool, 15% nylon blend. White cotton pockets and waist band. The bottoms have velcro closure for cinching and are lined with nylon on the inside to reduce chaffing. Slack style hook closer with small gauge Talon zipper fly. 2″ high by 3″ wide belt loops. Slack style front pockets with button close back pockets. The seat is double pained for strength.

Approximate Measurements:
20.5″ inseam
35″ waist
31″ from top of waist to bottom
12″ from top of waist to crotch seam

Holubar Gaiters

You are looking at a pair of Holubar Gaiters circa early 1970s or later as denoted by the logo with no climber. These gaiters are made of two layers of the 65/35 poly cotton blend, predecessor to the 60/40 nylon cotton blend popularized by Sierra Designs. The unique design of these gaiters has YKK zippers closing from top to bottom accompanied by five snaps for securing. Spring loaded cord locks with draw at the top with matching red and blue laces to secure under the arch of the boot. These laces are strung through two grommets on each side and can be tied off to fit different size boots. Leather reinforced lace hook for securing on the boot laces at the toe. Also featuring leather reinforced side panels where the lace grommets pass through.

These gaiters measure about 17.5″ high from the side to the top. 19″ across at the top from zipper to zipper and 14″ across at elastic ankle

Cari-Kit Two Man Backpacking tent – early 1970s

 This two-man  tent is constructed using two poles at front one at rear. The front poles fit together with loops at the top and support the tent body which is ran up over the crossed loops and pulled taut with a staked cord. The single rear pole is shorter and is secured by top and bottom grommets and staked down with a cord. The tent comes to a high point at the front and is only about half as tall at the foot. The tent has a rain fly, but does not offer  a fully enclosed vestibule. It would most likely be considered a two or three season tent.

I received this tent from the original owner who said it was purchased from the original Holubar store in Boulder, Colo. in the early 70s. The tent bears a similarity to Holubar tents of the era and has good reason. Cari-Kit was the label originally used on Holubar’s line of sew-it-yourself products in 1972.  The name was later abandoned and the kits rebranded as Holubar Sew-It-Yourself Kits.

Other popular kit producers of the day include: Frostline, Altra, Eastern Mountain Sports, Country Ways, Mountain Adventure, Sundown and Plain Brown Wrapper. EMS enjoys continued success though the production of kits has since ceased. A newly resurected Holubar label produces fashionable and functional pieces in homage to the company name

Measures approx:

90″ long
60″ across
51″ high at front

Weighs approx:
6.5 lbs

This tent is available for sale.

1960s Gerry Single-man Backpacking Tent

Gerry Cunningham is arguably the father of light weight camping and that’s the slogan used on this 1960s single man tent. The company he founded lived light weight, innovation and quality and proudly displayed this on their products, books and in their marketing. “warmth without the weight” is another slogan displayed on products of this era.

This innovative-for-its day tent is constructed using piece-together aluminum poles, two front, and one rear. The poles do not use shock cords. Front poles fit into a looped cross member at front and grommets in the rear. The tent goes up easily, but is not free-standing like later dome tents so it’s staked down at the corners and with front and rear guy lines. Includes rain fly and has a front vestibule on the tent body making it good for three or four seasons depending on the type of climate the user was in.

It packs up small at just over 12 inches in length and weighing approximately 5 lbs. Constructed it measures approximately:

78″ long
48″ wide
43″ high at front