1950s Football Sideline Warm Up Jacket.

Vintage 1950s Football Sideline Warm Up Jacket

What I believe to be a 1950s football sideline warmup jacket. The jacket is made of a thick, blanket like denim with an oversized cut. D shaped pockets on the exterior and interior. Metal clasp closure. Silk screened Mahomet Bulldogs 10 on the back. I’ve traced the logo back to an Ohio High School, but know little else about the jacket or manufacturer as there’s no label. I’d guess the piece or pieces like it were manufactured by Champion or Wilson. A part from them appearing in some old photos, there’s really not any information on these available.

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1950s Western Field by Montgomery Ward Upland Bird Hunting Jacket

Details about Vintage 1950s Western Field Montgomery Ward Upland BIRD Hunting Jacket Men's Med

Vintage Western Field bird hunting jacket. Black Label vintage denotes age sometime between the 30s and 50s. Has game pocket around back, call pocket, hand pockets and lower hip pockets. Corduroy lining on collar and cuffs. Under the collar is a button down flap hiding an elastic band. Not entirely sure its us. Awesome lines and construction on this piece. Gusseted vented pits and back for ease of movement. Nice heavy sturdy duck cloth cotton canvas.

Camp 7 Down Jacket

Vintage Camp 7 Down Coat

The always innovative Camp 7 line is descendant of the Alp Sport and Alpine Designs lines conceived by founder George Lamb of Boulder Colorado in the 1970s. This coat is exemplifies the company’s innovative spirit in the cut and construction of this outdoor staple.

Notice specifically the construction of this coat around the arms. Where many competitors would join the torso with the arms in simple perpendicular fashion, the Camp 7 design utilizes a more complex design that includes additional quilting to form a more contoured fit and eliminates a hard shoulder seam. Additional details including the internal seam finishing in black along the back and front panels reduces fraying on high friction areas. Designers also chose the use of Polargaurd for the pocket insulation as opposed to down. Polarguard, a relatively newer product for the period was probably seen as a more durable alternative for an often used, well-worn area.

Subtle differences in the hood color, embossed snaps, which differ from the coats snaps and individual materials tag suggest the hood was a sold separately option for this coat.

 

 

1980s North Face Brown Label Down Jacket

Vintage 80s The North Face Brown Label Down Jacket

Nice example of a later first generation puffer jacket.  This piece was manufactured in the mid 1980s near the end of this iconic style’s run. Some of the giveaways as to its more recent age are the embossed buttons, TNF branded zipper pull and materials tag.  Earlier versions of this jacket were made of rip stop nylon inside and out as opposed to the 65/35 poly cotton shell seen here. Construction also included what I refer to as stitched rivets at stress points such as pocket openings.

The earliest down jackets from The North Face (and brown label equipment in general) were all made in the USA, but the label didn’t start reflecting that until the late 70s when a shift in manufacturing started to take hold. It wasn’t until people started to question where their items were made that it became part of the strategy to include ‘Made in the USA’ in the branding.

1950s Monarch USN G1 Flight Jacket

Vintage 1950s Monarch USN G1 Flight Jacket

This is a prime example of the sought after Monarch USN G1 flight jacket. The Monarch made jackets were produced just one year post WWII in 1951. The jacket shows specification MIL-J-7823 (AER) and contract no. N383s-80667.  Features of this particular style that set it apart from other flight jackets such as the A-2 used by the USAAF include a “belted” back, gusseted shoulder seems at the back for greater movement. Shearling collar with collar strap and a large internal map pocket. The jackets were constructed of soft but durable goat skin.  Jackets are marked USN with stencil on the underside of the collar.

 

 

 

Carikit by Holubar Down Insulation Layer Jacket.

Holubar Carikit Down Insulation Layer Jacket

Carikit was Holubar’s foray into the sew-it-yourself market in the mid 1970s. The name was later changed to Holubar Sew-It-Yourself Kits for stronger brand recognition with the parent company. This garment could be used as a layering piece or  worn as a jacket. The style first popularized by Eddie Bauer features elastic cuffs and collar. Small snaps and two front pockets.

1960’S Levis Leather Type 3 Leather Jacket – Big E

Vintage 60'S Levis Leather Type 3 Jacket - Big E- suede rough out

1960s Levis leather rough out leather jacket. The Jacket is similar in cut and construction to the Type 3 denim jacket produced during the same period, but has some pattern differences namely in the sleeves. Type 3 denim jackets are constructed using basically two pieces (not including the cuff) while the sleeves on this jacket are made up of four pieces. The torso of the jacket follows a much more similar pattern. Another noticeable difference is the use of snaps instead of the metal stud buttons.

I’ve seen other listings claiming the jackets are suede, but I would classify it as rough out. The texture (even when new I am guessing) is just not as fine as suede. I’ve also seen listings claiming buck skin, which I can see judging by the inside of the jacket, but it seems more likely they were made from cow hide.

Similar jackets may contain Levi’s “short horn” Western Wear Label.