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Early Winters Silver Lining Insulated Jacket

21 Mar

Decades before Columbia Sportswear’s Omni-heat, Early Winters produced the Silver Lining. A Mylar like lining which reflected body heat, encased in a nylon shell. This piece was truly ahead of its time, as many of Early Winter’s products were. The Seattle-based manufacturer was the first company to use Gore-Tex fabric for commercial purposes in tents and jackets. Early Winters was at the forefront of outdoor innovation with iconic products like the Omnipotent and Pocket Hotel Tents and loads of co-branded products from candle lanterns to knifes to walking sticks.

This particular jacket is constructed of a nylon shell with horizontal quilting stitches. Nice lines around the shoulders give it a much more modern appearance and reduce seems along the shoulders. Zip and snap closure down the front. Wide wrists with Velcro closure. About a two-inch collar and elastic around the bottom hem. This piece is dual purpose and can be worn as an outer layer or insulating layer beneath a parka. Inside is a white mesh lining over the reflective silver lining. the two integrated hand pockets make for internal pockets as well.

Early-mid 70s Sierra Designs 60/40 Mountain Parka

1 Mar

The original 60/40 mountain parka by Sierra Designs. Constructed of the fabric famed for its day as the superior protector against the elements. In a time before Gore-Tex and other such membrane backed fabrics, this blend of Nylon and Cotton loomed with a tight weave was the number one choice of outdoor enthusiast against rain, snow and wind. Prior to its introduction in 1968 most parkas of this style were made of a Polyester and Cotton blend which was much more permeable to the elements. This particular example is an earlier version evident by the sparse labeling and lack of embossed buttons.

The parka is constructed of a Navy Blue shell made entirely of the 60/40 material. The classic construction includes two hip pockets with side entry and Velcro closed top entry. Two bellowed chest pockets also with Velcro closure. A single zip closed back pocket which opens up to the entire upper half of the jacket body. Closure consists of a large gauge YKK zipper with extended pull for ease of use while wearing gloves. Also a snap close-storm flap. Features an integrated hood with offset seams to prevent pooling around the neck and shoulders. Inside the khaki liner is made from 60/40 up top and through out the sleeves and hood to further guard against the elements where it matters most. Then a lighter nylon lighter around the lower allowing the jacket to slide easily over the hips. Nylon cord cinch runs through the hood with leather lace locks. Also a Nylon draw cord at the waist which most likely also had the leather locks at some point, but are now missing.

 

Vintage 1960s Motorcycle Patrol Jacket ~size 42~ Cal Leathers Style

17 Jan

This thick black heavy leather patrolman’s jacket is perfect for those who ride. Unfortunately this jacket has no labels or tags to help define its history, but I can assure you it’s the real deal. Badge holder, Serval zippers, heavy weight leather. It would be really easy for me to say this jacket is horsehide, which I very well might be, but with out a tag to prove it, I’ll stop short of that claim. I don’t have the expertise to say for certain. I have some jackets in my collection marked horsehide and others that are not and depending on the tanning process they can be very similar.

This jacket has a nice black satin liner in near perfect shape. Two had pockets and one inside pocket both lined with heavy cotton. Side lacing for a custom waist fit. Interestingly it is void of belt loops around the waist. Has snaps for a fur collar mount and black shearling lining the zippered wrists to keep the cold out.

Really nice shape for its age. a couple off-black spots near the badge holder. Visible if you’re looking for them. Also a little wear around the insides of the cuffs.

No size tag, but measures out to about a 42. See measurements below.

24″ pit to pit (sides flare out in the pits)
21″ across below the pit
20″ shoulder to shoulder
18.5″ pit to cuff
25″ shoulder to cuff
20″ top of zip to hem
25″ collar to hem in back

available on etsy https://www.etsy.com/people/basecampvintage

California Sportswear ‘Californian’ Leather Motorcycle Patrol Jacket

13 Jan

Highway patrolman style jacket by California Sportswear Company of Los Angeles, CA. The jacket is cut from “Selected Steerhide” which is “California Chrome Tanned” All this according to the label. Tan job is exceptional. Nice sheen on this heavy leather.

Very similar in style to the California Highway Patrol jackets but is lacking snaps at the collar for a fur add-on as well as the zippered cuffs. Instead has button close cuffs and epaulets. Has snap close loops for a belt and lace up side gussets, which are missing laces. Has stitch holes on left breast where an emblem of some type was one sewn.  Talon zipper. Probably of a 60s vintage.

1950’S “Cossacks” Wool Car Club Jacket

18 Aug

The base is a Golden Bear, wool varsity style jacket. Faded burgundy patterned nylon lining, ribbed elastic cuffs, hem and collar. The jacket itself is a dark green with white snaps and accents. Would be a pretty cool jacket to have on its own, but that’s just the base. A fully embroidered back piece let’s you know this dude was one bad ass Cossack. Big top rocker spells it our for you in a cool font. The C trails off in the shape of a Cossack sword called the Shashka. Below that a real fierce-looking fella rides into glory, sword drawn, jockeying a V8 like a horse. Bottom rocker reads “Hayward Calif”. Chain stitched on the front left breast is “Jim”. Under that reads “FoMoCo” indicating this was a Ford squad, or at least Jim was partial to them.

I can’t find any information on the Cossacks car club. I am almost certain there is no relationship to the now famed motorcycle gang. Judging by this jacket, the car club predated the MC by quite a few years.

 

 

Vintage National Park Service Windbreaker Jacket

13 May

*Apologies if you were watching this on eBay. Apparently it’s illegal to sell there and the listing was pulled shortly before it ended.

National Park Service windbreaker. Picked up in Colorado, it may be from one of a number of national parks, but the closest being Rocky Mountain National Park.

Very lightweight, made of single layer nylon. Jacket features a stowaway hood, which can be rolled up and secured via loops and buttons around the lightly padded collar. Two zip close front pockets. Nylon draw cord at waist and hood. YKK main zipper.

Embroidered patch is stitched on to left sleeve. Patch measures about 3.75″ tall by 3″ across and is in nice shape.

Jacket is in nice shape save for a couple small holes in the back bottom of the jacket, most likely from sitting or leaning up against something.

Marked size larger

Measures:
24″ top of zip to hem
21.5″ pit to zip
24″ pit to pit

Woolrich 60/40 Mountain Parka

30 Jan

This Woolrich Parka features classic styling composed of materials and craftsman ship that was top of the line in its day. The shell is made of the famed blend 60/40 Cotton/Nylon material popularized by Sierra Designs in the early 70s. This material was most weather proof fabric of its time, before Gore-Tex. Linking is made of a poly cotton blend with Nylon sleeve liner. This ingenious design allows the wearer to slip the jacket on and off over wool shirts and the likes with no binding or bunching. One inside pocket and double breast and hip pockets. Elastic cuff closure, waist and hood draw cords with leather disc cord locks. Main closure comes via a heavy gauge YKK two-way zipper and logo embossed brass tone snaps. The 60/40 has a nice sheen and tends to make separate panels different shades of blue in different light. Not all 60/40 is created equal. Depending on the cotton and nylon fibers used the material can vary in thickness, stiffness and sheen. The Woolrich sheep logo of this time period was recently relaunched and dubbed the “White Collection”. The line is quite nice and does well to honor styles like these.

Levi’s Type III Big E Trucker Jacket w/ Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Patches

9 Oct

The Levi’s Type III Big E Jacket similar style to what is known today as the Trucker Jacket, but with small differences like no side pockets and bright orange thread. The Type III is successor to the Type II and Type I. The jacket is Big E era which makes it pre -1971, Though the style continued on for the remainder of the 70s with the small e tag.

This particular jacket is has a total of seven patches commemorating the great Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta from the 1980s. Back Patches are from 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86 with another undated patch on the right shoulder. The AIBF was started in 1972 and is the world’s largest balloon festival.

Lee Riders Sanforized, Union Made Selvedge Denim

10 Oct

Lee Riders, also known as the 101Z debuted in the 1950s and represent  a transition from the company’s work wear history in to more casual, mass appeal wears.

On this particular pair the inside Tag is marked: Lee Riders Sanforized Waist 32 Union Made in the USA.  The Button back is stamped: R.  Zipper is made by Talon. Lee riveted front and coin pockets. “lazy S” stitched on rear pockets.  The “branded” Lee patch is long gone. You’ll notice on Lees, unlike Levi’s the selvedge denim self edged appears on only one side of the outer seam.

As with most items from  time and place predating the “throw-away age”, these jeans are well-worn and have been mended multiple times. There’s a bout a 4.5″ x 6″ patch on the  right thigh.  A 2″ x 3″ patch on the left side below the rear pocket. A hole and repair with red thread on the left knee, a small hole forming below the zipper on the right side front, and a 4″ hole in the left cheek with additional wear below.  Some white paint and other darker stains. Round out the patina that only time can create.

Mountain Equipment Co-op Parka

20 Feb

In short, Mountain Equipment Co-op was founded in Vancouver, BC circa 1971 by a group of individuals sick of crossing the border to shop at REI in Seattle. This malcontent for border crossings and a passion for quality outdoor goods has led to the MEC to become one of the largest co-ops of outdoorsmen in the world. The Co-op is still in operation today making gear for its user/owners with the same enthusiasm as they had 40 years ago.

The parka seen here from the early to mid 1970s is very similar to what one would have found at REI during the same time period. It is made of a 65/35 cotton/poly blend, in an ever popular color combination for the time. What excites me the most about this parka is the thought that went in to the lining. Both the lower half of the torso and sleeves are lined in a light nylon. This allows for much freer movement as friction between the parka and any under layer is greatly reduced. The alternating of Navy and Khaki is quite nice as well.

The parka appears to have been produced under contract by Winner Sportswear LTD of Vancouver. Using local and foreign manufactures to produce items is common amongst Co-ops. Here you can see a later parka contracted by REI from Korean manufacturer Natural Comfort.

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