Camp 7 Down Jacket

Vintage Camp 7 Down Coat

The always innovative Camp 7 line is descendant of the Alp Sport and Alpine Designs lines conceived by founder George Lamb of Boulder Colorado in the 1970s. This coat is exemplifies the company’s innovative spirit in the cut and construction of this outdoor staple.

Notice specifically the construction of this coat around the arms. Where many competitors would join the torso with the arms in simple perpendicular fashion, the Camp 7 design utilizes a more complex design that includes additional quilting to form a more contoured fit and eliminates a hard shoulder seam. Additional details including the internal seam finishing in black along the back and front panels reduces fraying on high friction areas. Designers also chose the use of Polargaurd for the pocket insulation as opposed to down. Polarguard, a relatively newer product for the period was probably seen as a more durable alternative for an often used, well-worn area.

Subtle differences in the hood color, embossed snaps, which differ from the coats snaps and individual materials tag suggest the hood was a sold separately option for this coat.

 

 

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Vintage Beck 3/4 Helmet

Vintag Beck Arnley 3/4 Motorcycle Helmet

The Beck Distribution Corp was a pioneer in motorcycle distributing sourcing OEM (original equipment manufacturer) and aftermarket parts and accessories for foreign bikes to suit American rider’s tastes. The company dates all the way back to the early 1900’s. I would estimate the helmet seen here is from the early-mid 1960s, but have yet to track down an exact date or model number. Vintage American Motorcyclist Magazines currently on Google Books gives hints to the popularity of this three-quarter style helmet and the Beck Corp itself during those early 60s. In 1969 Beck Distribution Corp merged with Arnley Brake Shoe Company and the name and logo were changed to reflect that. So if anything I can say this helmet is at least pre 1969.

An interesting thing on this helmet is in the liner and foam core. The dense foam core is constructed of two halves instead of a single piece. Also the liner that once held the soft comfort foam is made of a nylon material, which gives the helmet interior a nice sort of satin finish, but wouldn’t be very breathable or moisture wicking. It’s evident that later safety improvements replaced some of these designs quirks.
The reflective squares on sides and back are a common addition to helmets of the era. A lone sticker inside shows the size as S 6 3/4″ and Made in Japan. One theory I have given Beck’s business model is the helmet was produced by Arai and then stickered Beck by the distributor, but at this time that remains just a theory.

Early Winters Silver Lining Insulated Jacket

Vintage 1980s Early Winters Silver Lining Insulated Jacket

Decades before Columbia Sportswear’s Omni-heat, Early Winters produced the Silver Lining. A Mylar like lining which reflected body heat, encased in a nylon shell. This piece was truly ahead of its time, as many of Early Winter’s products were. The Seattle-based manufacturer was the first company to use Gore-Tex fabric for commercial purposes in tents and jackets. Early Winters was at the forefront of outdoor innovation with iconic products like the Omnipotent and Pocket Hotel Tents and loads of co-branded products from candle lanterns to knifes to walking sticks.

This particular jacket is constructed of a nylon shell with horizontal quilting stitches. Nice lines around the shoulders give it a much more modern appearance and reduce seems along the shoulders. Zip and snap closure down the front. Wide wrists with Velcro closure. A two-inch collar and elastic around the bottom hem. This piece is dual purpose and can be worn as an outer layer or insulating layer beneath a parka. Inside is a white mesh lining over the reflective silver lining. the two integrated hand pockets make for internal pockets as well.

1960s Bell Toptex Shorty Motorcycle Helmet – White with Silver Metal Flake

The Bell -Toptex Shorty helmet debuted in the early 1960s and was popular among motorcyclist through the end of the decade. the low profile and light nature made it a perfect helmet for roaming the cities and country roads on Triumphs, Harleys and small displacement UJMs. The helmet was Snell Memorial Foundation approved, predating DOT ratings and was very similar in style to the Buco Guardian helmets of that day. The shell extends down to about the top of the ear and a vinyl collar in connection with the chin strap secure and protect the rider from excessive wind. A variety of visors and shields were available for the front.

Still trying to figure out the role of “Toptex” in Bell helmets of this era. Originally I figured Toptex simply referred to a shell material, but in patent documents, it seems the name of the company was actually named Bell-Toptex. It seems that in the 70s the company dropped Toptex from the name and or shell material.

Tall L.L. Bean Insulate Main Hunting Shoe

Based on the original boot created by Leon Leonwood Bean in 1912, this 1970s version of the boot maintains the character and functionality that launched the brand. Leather uppers and rubber bottoms these boots were meant to lend a good foot feel of the terrain to hunters in soggy lands. This 12″ tall insulated version offers a little more protection from the cold in the form of a lightly lined rubber bottom.  Other past and present iterations of this boot range in height from low-cut shoes to 6,  8 and 10 inch versions and up to 16 inches. Triple stitching attach the uppers to bottoms while double stitching throughout makes for a rugged classic. The hand written font on the label denotes these are an older version from before the company switched to a block font sometime in the 1970s.