10th Mountain Division Lugged Leather Ski Boots – 1943

Barker Shoe Co. 10th Mountain Division ski boots. Boots are dated 1943  Produced in Boston.  This example has original waxed laces with metal ends. Also the wool foot bed for insulation. Goodyear heavy lugged sole provides traction when not full of snow or mud. From what I understand the original design had a flat sole, but traction was impossible so they later retrofitted these boots with the lugs. Squared off toe allows for maximum heel lift during cross-country maneuvers.

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WWI Era US Navy Electrician Mate Shield Patch. Radarman

All pieces named J.H. Fales.  Believed to be an early Radarman uniform based on the left facing eagle patch.

1960s Moncler Lionel Terray Duvet Down Coat

Vintage 1960s Lionel Terray Moncler Duvet Down Coat

While Gerry Cunningham lead the “warmth without the weight” down movement here in the states,  the Moncler company followed suit on the other side of the Atlantic. The company founded in 1952 enlisted the help of famed explorer Lionel Terray to help with the design of its expedition weight jackets in early 1960s. The result is what you see here.

This particular coat was found with a coyote fur hood liner which was a later add. It had button holes around the edges for attachment to a NB-3 or similar military parka. Given the condition of the fur, which appeared to have been laundered, I decided to remove it and bring the jacket back to original. A solution of baking soda and water was applied to the heavily soiled areas around the collar cuffs and front and left to soak in the tub. You’ll see in the pictures the incredible amount of dirt that was released.  The coat was then agitated by hand and rinsed thoroughly.

These coats contain a great deal of down giving them the loft needed to sustain the wearer in arctic conditions. The two rows of snaps allow for an adjustable fit in order to accommodate varying layers of clothing underneath.  Zippers are not used as thy can be a hassle in arctic temperatures and a malfunction of one would be a pretty grim reality in the cold. The coat also does not have any pockets which could become filled with snow and create compromised areas for which the cold can make its way in. Candidly speaking, I rather enjoy having accessible pockets in my coat. See my post on the later REI Expedition Down Coat for comparison.

Gerry Vagabond Back Pack

Gerry Vagabond Backpack

Late 1960s early 70s model Gerry Vagabond Pack. This is the pack that help solidified Gerry’s role in the outdoor sports manufacturing industry. The design was applied to frame packs and became an icon and a signature style. Whether you’re a fan or not of the horizontal pockets comes down to personal preference I suppose. While allowing for maximum compartmentalized storage and organization the pockets were somewhat limiting of the objects that could fit within.

This pack is an earlier model as denoted by the Gerry Boulder, Colorado logo, Coats & Clark zippers and the very interesting straps. These are unlike any other’s I’ve seen. Nylon straps with a foam pad. The pads are coated like that of a floatation device and adjustable on the strap to provide a good comfort level.  The “wish bone” style pack support is removable and is secured by three snap anchor points.

This model pack was one of several featured in issue five of Backpacker Magazine (1974) and received good marks.

 

Aerostich Gore-tex Roadcrafter Classic One Piece

Aerostich Gore-tex Roadcrafter Classic One Piece. 42

This is an older Roadcrafter suit by Aerostich. It’s constructed of Cordura and Gore-tex  and appears to be the same pattern still in use. The new models bear a Roadcrafter label not found on this one. Aerostich produces some of the finest riding gear available. All pieces are made by hand in Duluth Minnesota USA.

Kastinger Matterhorn Mountaineering Boots

Kastinger Matterhorn Mountaineering Boots

A true early-mid 1970s mountaineering boot. This Kastinger has a couple unique construction attributes.  The hinged heel allows for the boot to flex without stressing putting undue stress on the boot or the wearer. Second feature that makes this boot both special and revolutionary is the stitchless injection-molded welt, which is quite a departure from the Norwegian and Goodyear welts most boots of this era used.

The gaiters seen here are a similar era (maybe a little later) The North Face nylon blend model.

Vintage Dr. Pepper Metal Thermometer Sign

Vintage Dr. Pepper Painted Thermometer Sign

The thermometer sign in itself is not a rare piece. My research shows it to be a favorite advertising format for many products, for the first half or more of the 20th century.  Dr. Pepper signs of many versions can be found with thermometers. Many using the “Enjoy Hot or Cold” slogan. This particular version, inclusive of “the friendly Pepper Upper” text seemed to be a bit more rare in nature.  The sign was painted on as opposed to porcelain which may have affected durability and decreased production rates.